Bacteria Breaking Antibiotic Environments

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The video below by researchers at the Harvard Medical School and Technion–Israel Institute of Technology shows bacteria break zones of ever increasing concentrations of antibiotics hence demonstrates how bacteria becomes “impervious to drugs”. They are able to

In a creative stroke inspired by Hollywood wizardry, scientists from Harvard Medical School and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have designed a simple way to observe how bacteria move as they become impervious to drugs. [2]

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Your Phone, Tablet, and Computer Screens Aren’t Safe from Hackers

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Pixels on your gadgets’ screens act as accidental antennae that constantly broadcast screens’ contents. A new paper says the industry needs to fix this security risk before hackers can exploit it.

This hack is possible because the internals of every computing device we own give off electromagnetic radiation. It leaks from the cables and circuitry that carry the display signal from the processor to the screen, and it’s even emitted by the screen pixels themselves. These pixels [Correct? Else what?] become accidental antennas that transmit the display signal into our surroundings—one that a would-be hacker could tune into.

via AGU Highlights – Radio Science – Your Phone, Tablet, and Computer Screens Aren’t Safe from Hackers

DOI: 10.1002/2016RS006034

Best Practices for Scientific Computing

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A summary of a very interesting paper on “Best Practices for Scientific Computing” I read a year ago.

andrea cirillo's blog

I reproduce here below principles from the amazing paper Best Practices for Scientific Computing, published on 2012 by a group of US and UK professors. The main purpose of the paper is to “teach”  good programming habits shared from professional developers to people  that weren’t born developer, and became developers just for professional purposes.

Scientists spend an increasing amount of time building and using software. However, most scientists are never taught how to do this efficiently

Best Practices for Scientific Computing

  1. Write programs for people, not computers.

    1. a program should not require its readers to hold more than a handful of facts in memory at once
    2. names should be consistent, distinctive and meaningful
    3. code style and formatting should be consistent
    4. all aspects of software development should be broken down into tasks roughly an hour long
  2. Automate repetitive tasks.

    1. rely on the computer to repeat tasks
    2. save recent commands in…

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