Facebook Introduces Physical Keys (FIDO U2F) as Security

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Today, January 26, Facebook announced that they have introduced ‘physical keys’ (i.e. usb keys) as an option of the two-factor authentication. Google has already introduced this two years earlier.

A few years ago two-factor authentication was introduced by Google and Facebook among many other companies which allowed the user to set an extra security measure to avoid loosing their account in case their password was stolen. This extra layer required the user, if using a new computer or IP, to enter an authentication code generated (regularly) through an app (e.g. Google’s authenticator for Google accounts).

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Check if you’ve had a security breach

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Many of the popular websites and services have been or at some point or will be targetted and exploited. As a result, it is most likely that at least one of your online accounts has been pwned at some point. This doesn’t mean your account has been cracked but it could mean that some of your private information has been leaked (e.g. email, password, personal info like date of birth, etc…). Recently Gmail has been exploited by attachement phishing.

There’s no guaranteed way to check if your account has been hacked but one way is to check if you’ve been pwned. Just enter your username or email to check if you’ve been pwned.

Links – Have Fun Typing & Learning Vi/Vim Shortcuts

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Vim Adventures – navigate the Vi/Vim land by learning Vi/Vim shortcuts

ZType – Typing (shooting) Game

Your Phone, Tablet, and Computer Screens Aren’t Safe from Hackers

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Pixels on your gadgets’ screens act as accidental antennae that constantly broadcast screens’ contents. A new paper says the industry needs to fix this security risk before hackers can exploit it.

This hack is possible because the internals of every computing device we own give off electromagnetic radiation. It leaks from the cables and circuitry that carry the display signal from the processor to the screen, and it’s even emitted by the screen pixels themselves. These pixels [Correct? Else what?] become accidental antennas that transmit the display signal into our surroundings—one that a would-be hacker could tune into.

via AGU Highlights – Radio Science – Your Phone, Tablet, and Computer Screens Aren’t Safe from Hackers

DOI: 10.1002/2016RS006034

WordPress has a Linux client?

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Why haven’t I known about this earlier?

While going through my profile account I discovered there’s a desktop client for Linux and specifically an Ubuntu package.

I immediately installed. You can download it here or run this code to download and install it on you Ubunu machine:


cd ~/Downloads
wget -O wp.deb https://public-api.wordpress.com/rest/v1.1/desktop/linux/download?type=deb&ref=getapps
sudo dpkg -i wp.deb
rm wp.deb

If you’re on a non-debian machine you canalso get the tarball and use your systems’ package manager to install it:


wget -O wp.tar.gz https://public-api.wordpress.com/rest/v1.1/desktop/linux/download

Now you can enjoy blogging within your Linux machine without openning a web browser.

Update: As a matter of fact, correct me if I’m mistaken, the client is a Unity web app.

Evernote in Linux

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For some reason Evernote doesn’t seem to care about Linux users. They prefer to work on their (slow) web interface. I don’t understand how much harder is it to modify the Mac app for Linux?

The main reason I am writing this post is not to describe the available Evernote interfaces for Linux but to introduce a SublimeText package for Evernote and share a snippet I’ve made.

There is already some articles out there that describe the Evernote gui alternatives like this & this. So it suffices to just list them:

  • NixNote2
  • Everpad: includes a Unity lens but it doesn’t work in Ubuntu 15.04
  • Geeknote

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Maps for Linux & Ubuntu

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Everyone uses digital maps these days, I assume. At least I do. Since I’ve been using them more often lately, I checked if there are any apps for Linux and especially Ubuntu. The search returned 4 apps.

Maps (aka gnome-maps)

is a map application for GMONE. Its use is slick and fast. It is supposed to be simplistic
Search and directions is functional (based on MapQuest if I’m not mistaken) but geolocation isn’t. Moreover, the satellite imagery is not available at high resolution.

Maps_015.png

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