Growing Cancer Cells & Coronal Mass Ejections Are Visually Similar

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Using solar and astronomical image processing techniques and mathematical theory we have developed novel image analysis techniques to track the growth of tumours and other cell-based structures, which can be crucial for advancements of therapeutics to treat diseases such as cancers.

The visual similarities between coronal mass ejections and the outward invasion of cells from a tumour spheroid are striking. This study aims to help us better understand changes in the tissue architecture which are associated with tumour growth.

source: Departments of Physics, Aberystwyth University

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Nearly Naked Black Hole

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Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Advanced Visualization Laboratoy at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab

Update on the Rosetta (comet) mission

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The Rosetta orbiter is continuing its science until the end of the extended Rosetta mission in September 2016. The lander’s future is less certain. This film covers some of what we’ve learnt from Philae about comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko so far.

This includes information about the comet’s surface structure from the ROsetta Lander Imaging System – or ROLIS camera – a copy of which can be found at the German Space Agency, DLR, in Berlin.

Data from all Philae’s instruments has informed the work of the other scientific teams. Rosetta scientists have analysed grains from the comet and discovered that it contains carbon rich molecules from the early formation of our solar system.

The video also contains footage from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Germany – where a flight replica of Philae’s COSAC instrument is maintained in a vacuum chamber to test commands. COSAC has already detected over a dozen molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen from the dust cloud kicked up from landing.